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This master class will focus on techniques to achieve emergency haemostasis, exoskeleton repair, fluid therapy and euthanasia.
Delegates will explore 7 first aid options for invertebrates: ectoparasite removal, haemolymph loss, dysecdysis, autotomy, wound repair, Lepidoptera wing repair and snail shell repair.

Available with advanced booking only. Tickets are £40.00.

Details

Invertebrates are commonly kept as pets, within zoological collections, teaching colleges and within laboratories. Invertebrates may present as an emergency because of damage to the exoskeleton due to dysecdysis and because of trauma. Penetrating wounds to the soft tissue, shell or cuticle may result in haemolymph loss which must be dealt with immediately, as death can occur rapidly.

An introductory lecture will discuss techniques to achieve emergency haemostasis, exoskeleton repair, fluid therapy and euthanasia. 

Workshops will follow and delegates will explore 7 first aid options for invertebrates: ectoparasite removal, haemolymph loss, dysecdysis, autotomy, wound repair, Lepidoptera wing repair and snail shell repair. 

Ectoparasite removal- a common problem seen in captive invertebrates. The removal of these mites manually is a first-aid method to avoid debilitation from a heavy parasite burden. 

Haemolymph loss- haemolymph loss in invertebrates can be fatal. There are several techniques to achieve haemostasis. 

Dysecdysis- a common problem in captive invertebrates often caused by environmental factors. Can be fatal or severely compromise quality of life if not rectified quickly. 

Autotomy- external factors such as enclosure design may cause haemolymph loss from limb entrapment. Autotomy may be essential. 

Lepidoptera wing repair – Lepidoptera may present with damaged wings that have torn or folded because of poor handling, becoming trapped or from trauma in flight. A first-aid technique involving splinting the wing will be demonstrated. 

Snail shell repair- Giant African land snails often suffer from shell trauma due to being dropped. Methods to repair shells will be demonstrated.

Speakers

Speakers to be confirmed
  • Dr Michelle O'Brien
    Dr Michelle O'Brien
    BVetMed CertZooMed MRCVS, DipECZM(ZHM), RCVS recognised Advanced Practitioner in Zoological Medicine
    Michelle O’Brien is one of the Veterinary and Wildlife Health Officers for the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (WWT) based at Slimbridge in Gloucestershire. After graduating from the Royal Veterinary College in 1999 she spent six and a half years in general and exotics referral practice, seeing a mix of small animal, zoo and exotic pet species. She gained the RCVS certificate in Zoological Medicine in 2005 and since 2015 is an RCVS recognized Advanced Practitioner in Zoological Medicine. Michelle has worked at WWT since 2006 and is part of the team that provides veterinary care at seven of the nine WWT centres in the UK and provides veterinary advice to a number of conservation programmes including the Great Crane Project and Spoon-billed sandpiper conservation breeding programmes.
  • Dr Sarah Pellett
    Dr Sarah Pellett
    BSc(Hons) MA VetMB CertAVP(ZooMed) DZooMed(Reptilian) MRCVS. RCVS Recognised Specialist in Zoological Medicine.
    Sarah Pellett graduated from University of Cambridge in 2006. During her degree she spent time in exotic practices and zoos both in the UK and abroad. She spent three years working at a first opinion and referral exotic animal practice in Manchester where she completed the RCVS Certificate in Advanced Veterinary Practice (Zoological Medicine). Sarah now works at Animates Veterinary Clinic, Thurlby, in Lincolnshire, seeing a wide range of first opinion and referral exotic animal cases. In 2017 she completed the RCVS Diploma in Zoological Medicine so she is now an RCVS recognised Specialist in Zoological Medicine.

    She is a member of the British Veterinary Association (BVA), the British Veterinary Zoological Society (BVZS), the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians (AAZV), the Association of Reptilian and Amphibian Veterinarians (ARAV), the Association of Exotic Mammal Veterinarians (AEMV) and the European Association of Avian Veterinarians (EAAV). She is also the veterinary adviser on invertebrate health for the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquaria (BIAZA), Terrestrial Invertebrate Working Group and a member of the committee for the Veterinary Invertebrate Society. She has recently become involved with the work for BIAZA Reptile and Amphibian Working Group.
ICARE 2019
London, UK